Jindera garden to support Murray Valley Sanctuary Refugee Group

WALL-TO-WALL WONDERS: The garden at Coorong, Jindera features many dry stone walls and recycled artworks with an abundance of natives softened by old roses, salvias and other bedding varieties.
WALL-TO-WALL WONDERS: The garden at Coorong, Jindera features many dry stone walls and recycled artworks with an abundance of natives softened by old roses, salvias and other bedding varieties.

A life-size horse made from old eight-gauge wire stands as a fitting nod to the past at ‘Coorong’, Jindera.

Once upon a time all the bakery horses in Albury were fed by the oats grown on the historic property at Hawthorn Road, reports its current owner Leanne Wheaton.

Together with husband Gordon Shaw and their three sons, the family has lived at Coorong since 1996 and brought to life a beautiful and eclectic garden.

On Sunday, October 15 they will throw open their gates for an open garden to support the work of the Murray Valley Sanctuary Refugee Group, which has helped more than 70 refugees make Albury-Wodonga their new home.

Coorong’s garden is blessed with many old trees including London Planes, a silky oak and a massive lemon-scented gum, according to Ms Wheaton who is fond of using recycling materials as artwork around the place. 

Old sleepers recovered from the bottom of the Hume weir have been used as a feature wall at the head of the running creek,  she said.

“A wall made from old metal packing tape, dog chains, rusty barbed wire and various other found objects is a feature in the orchard.”

Meanwhile recycled claw-footed baths have been used to great effect in the vegetable garden, saving the vegies from the ever-present pesky rabbits.

The garden features a number of dry stone walls constructed by John Cox, from Holbrook, who is also responsible for an impressive stone owl that resides among the trees and flowers.

“Original cart wheels from the property have been used to create the owl’s eyes and they look like they are suspended in space - it is truly a magic piece of art,” Ms Wheaton said.

The plantings in the garden are varied but Ms Wheaton has used lots of “tough plants” as she relies on dam water to water the garden.  

Australian natives abound but old roses, salvias and other bedding varieties add a softness to the garden. 

Beautiful old oranges trees laden with fruit every year were one of the main reasons the couple was first drawn to the property.

One of the features of the garden is a running creek lined with Eucalyptus Silver Princess whose bright pink flowers and lovely white bark contrast with the rounded river stones.  

“Children love to play in the creek and it is great for a paddle,” Ms Wheaton said.

The garden’s attributes are too many and varied to do justice here but Ms Wheaton will give a garden tour at 11.30am on the day.

There will be gourmet morning and afternoon teas with the family’s own Grass Roots Beef on the barbecue for lunch. 

Beechworth acapella group A Few Good Women will perform along with singer Nancy Masudi, whose family originally came to Australia from the Congo.  

Artist Alison Percy will be painting in the garden and have artwork for sale plus there will be plenty of home produce, books and plants to purchase.

  • Coorong’s open garden is on Sunday, October 15 from 9pm – 4pm at 173 Hawthorn Rd, Jindera. 
HANDS OF FRIENDSHIP: The family of Jonte Shaw, Liam Shaw, mum Leanne Wheaton, dad Gordon Shaw and Flynn Shaw in their garden at Coorong, Jindera.

HANDS OF FRIENDSHIP: The family of Jonte Shaw, Liam Shaw, mum Leanne Wheaton, dad Gordon Shaw and Flynn Shaw in their garden at Coorong, Jindera.